Petri 2.8 Color Corrected Super Rangefinder 35mm

Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford

The photos in the previous three posts are scans of 35mm Kodacolor prints, taken with this camera. Made by Kuribayashi Camera Industry Inc, in (where else?) Japan, the Petri 2.8 Color Corrected Super has a style reminiscent of a Leica, the preeminent 35mm camera of its day, which also had rangefinder assisted focusing.

The Petri 2.8 was my father's first 35mm camera, bought new in Japan when he was stationed with the army in South Korea during the mid 1950s. It was also my first 35mm camera; after his untimely death, I found the Petri among my dad's effects and sort of "self inherited" it, the only memento of his that I kept.

Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford

By the early 1970s, the Petri was already obsolete; in the 15 years since its manufacture, the state of the art for semi-pro and professional level cameras had become the single lens reflex interchangeable lens 35mm, popularized by the Asahi Pentax and Nikon F. The now out of date Petri had only a fixed-mount 45mm f2.8 lens, but as many photo enthusiasts have discovered it was, in a way, liberating to be restricted to the use of only one, normal field of view, prime lens. That limitation meant no telephoto shots of wildlife or wide angle panoramic views, but whatever one's own eyes saw, the Petri recorded that very well.

Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford

Compact enough to fit easily in the outside pocket of a sport coat or field jacket, the Petri was always readily at hand to grab a quick shot, and its whisper quiet leaf shutter was a lot less likely than a loud clanking SLR to suddenly freeze a rocking party cold dead. This camera didn't have a built in light meter, and I eventually bought a small Sekonic handheld, but I'd already gotten good at guesstimating exposure with the Sunny 16 Rule, and the meter was rarely used.

Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford

I ran a lot of rolls through it back in the film days, and what's interesting is- the Petri took very sharp and clear black and white photos (usually Kodak Plus X or Tri X, and sometimes Agfa), but with Kodacolor the prints were not quite exactly focused looking. Rather than being perfectly detailed, the Petri's color images were pleasing in a diffused, dream-like kind of way, like how memories seem to be.

Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford
Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford
Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford
Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford
Petri, rangefinder, camera, 35mm, leaf shutter, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford

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To see images taken with the Petri 2.8 rangefinder camera, go to:

Un jour à La Pointe de Fermin, 1972

One Evening At The East Rim Of Lake Abert, August 1973

Petri Kodacolor Portraits


Petri Kodacolor Portraits

Country and Western Express, Harry Johnston, Harley Anson, Paul Wilkinson, Paul Wilkensen, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Holiday Inn, Petri 2.8 Color Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter
The C&W Express: Harry, Harley, and Paul. Kearny, Nebraska
Here are a few more Kodacolor photographs taken with the Petri 2.8 Color Corrected Super rangefinder camera. Each photo has a story behind it, some of which are a short paragraph long, others somewhat longer, and a couple are 200+ page novel length. Maybe someday they'll be retold, but for now we'll just let the images stand alone, and be as expressive as a picture can be.

Petri 2.8 Color Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, 1947 Martin D-18, USFS, Forest Sevice, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford
Dave. Bishop, California
Petri 2.8 Color Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Mark Bonander, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford,  Minneapolis
Martha. St Paul, Minnesota
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Larry Bonander, Mark Bonander
Larry. Minneapolis, Minnesota
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford,C&W Express, Jackie Plann, Jacqui Plann, Jacquiline
Jacqui. Glendive, Montana
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford
Zoe. Fort Collins, Colorado
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Mark Bomander, Dick Bonander
Dick. Minneapolis, Minnesota
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Stryker, Big Thompson Canyon, Narrows, Canyon Inn, Steve Denlinger
Chester. Loveland, Colorado
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford
Cathy and Serge. Bishop, California
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Michael Brierly, Doris Moritz, the Corral, Diana Maize, Doreen
Michael. Loveland, Colorado
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Stryker, C&W Express, Judy Phillips, Rita Clark, Glendive, Rita Hoadus
Chester, Judy and Rita. Yellowstone, Montana
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jim Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Harry Johnston, C&W Express, Patsy Johnston
Harry. Glendive, Montana
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Karen Gracey, Karen Gracy, Jim Clifford
Karen. Fort Collins, Colorado
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Jim Clifford
Little Baby Jesus. Wheatland, Wyoming
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, Jim Clifford, Narrows, Canyon Inn, Big Thompson Canyon
Wayne and Friend. Loveland, Colorado
Petri, 2.8 ,Color, Special, rangefinder, 35mm, camera, Kodacolor, leaf shutter, Jazz Clifford, Jimmy Clifford, 1957 International Travelall, Gibson Southern Jumbo, Mark Bonander, Billy
The Author as a Young Man. Orofino, Idaho

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The last photo above wasn't taken with the Petri 2.8, although it is a Kodacolor print. It was snapped by Billy with his brand new Kodak Instamatic 110, which at the time was state of the art for affordable pocket cameras, and actually took quite decent images, considering its smaller size film format and low price.



One Evening At The East Rim Of Lake Abert, August 1973

1957, International Travelall, Kodacolor, asa 80, Oregon, Lake Abert, Abert Rim, Mark Bonander, a dog named blue, Petri 35 super, vintage road trip, vintage photograph, Jimmy Clifford, Jazz Clifford
Mark and Blue

One evening at the east rim of Lake Abert. Lake county, Oregon; August, 1973. Petri 2.8 Color Corrected Super rangefinder; Kodacolor, ASA 80, 1/50s at f8.

1957, International Travelall, Kodacolor, asa 80, Oregon, Lake Abert, Abert Rim, Mark Bonander, Petri 35 super, vintage, road trip, vintage photograph, Jimmy Clifford, Jazz Clifford
1957 International Travelall
1957, International Travelall, Kodacolor, asa 80, Oregon, Lake Abert, Abert Rim, Mark Bonander, Jimmy Clifford, Jazz Clifford, Petri 35 super, vintage, road trip, vintage photograph
Billy on the High Ground
1957, International Travelall, Kodacolor, asa 80, Oregon, Lake Abert, Abert Rim, Mark Bonander, Petri 35 super, vintage, road trip, vintage photograph, Jimmy Clifford, Jazz Clifford, uhaul
You Haul

There's a story here, of course, and an adventure: almost 2,500 miles of mountains and forests and desert and prairies; an indestructible 1957 International Travelall, with a dog named Blue in the back seat, pulling a trailer full of guitars, drums and amps, three down sleeping bags and hardly any luggage; friendly folks along the way, and diners serving breakfast all day; 3mph on a rutted dirt road in granny low gear over the Continental Divide; and beer, lots of beer.


Un Jour à La Pointe de Fermin, 1972

Point Fermin, lighthouse, San Pedro, James Victor Humble III, Jimmy Humble, Jimmy Clifford, Petri 2.8 Color Corrected Super, Kodacolor, ASA 80, Janice Humble, Jazz Clifford, Jimmy Clifford

Un jour à La Pointe de Fermin, Saint Pierre, avec Jacques Victor Humble III, 23 mai 1972. Petri 2.8 Color Corrected Super télémètre (rangefinder), Kodacolor, ASA 80, 1/50s à f5.6.


Stromberg-Carlson ASR-120 Stereo Tube Amplifier, Pt 2


In Part 1 of this series of posts about a pair of early 1960s Stromberg-Carlson ASR-120 stereo tube power amplifiers being rebuilt / restored / re-imagined, we talked about the basic design of the amp, its circuit, and its origins. While I've been lazy doing other things, like building new literal fences and mending old figurative ones, and merely thinking about getting my tube amp running, friend David from Massachusetts has been busy actually getting his ASR-120 project done.

As you can see in the photo above, the resulting finished and rebuilt amplifier is a real beauty. Here's a couple of pictures showing the circuitry inside of his amp before:


And after:


It's fairly obvious from looking at those two photos, that the amp has been almost completely rebuilt, with new components. I'll let David describe his process:

"I finished working on the ASR-120 late last night and ran some tests this afternoon. All is well, no exploding, no hum and it sounds very nice paired with the Minimus 7's. Some of the voltages are a bit high but that's probably a combination of the 120.5VAC from the wall and/or this specific 6CA4 tube.

The past two weeks have been spent obsessing about this amp and I've probably put 40 hours of thinking/labor into it during that time frame. In the end I decided to rebuild it entirely. All NOS sockets, a complete rewire and I repopulated the tag board with metal film/metal oxide resistors and Sprague 715P and 6PS polypropylene caps. Here's a partial list of some other mods/upgrades:

1) IEC socket and fuse holder on the rear; toggle power switch on the right side. Secondary AC outlet disconnected.
2) Rebuilt the filter section entirely.
3) Wired the heaters like in an old Fender, twisted and floating above the sockets.
4) Two 1N4007 diodes wired in series with the anodes of the 6CA4 rectifier to provide "soft fail" protection.
5) Two sets of RCA inputs - selectable via a mini toggle switch located on the front-right. Inputs were isolated and star grounded.
6) Speaker outputs moved from the top-front corners to the right side (the RCA inputs took their place).
7) 100K Alps stereo pot (excellent tracking and very quiet - it better be for $17!).
8) Bright white LED added off the 6.3V heaters (270 ohm 1W resistor, with a 1N4006 diode across the cathodes. The diode limits the LED's reverse voltage to 1.7v.)
9) Small red glass jewel for the power indicator (front-left). The LED wouldn't fit entirely inside the jewel so I pressed it in as far as I could and then covered the rear with black RTV gasket sealant.
10) I wasn't in love with the chicken head knob that was on the volume control, so I switched back over to my favorite maroon Davies round pointer.
11) Tube shields on the 7199s - why not, I had them in the parts bin.
12) I did take one bit of advice from Tom Bavis and replaced the two .01uF feedback caps with .15uF. Initially I wanted to wire some different value caps to a rotary switch before running it over to the board but in the end I thought it better to keep those wires short.


Here are a couple overhead shots of the chassis, before:


And after:


And finally, a JPEG of the voltage measurements taken at 120.5VAC from the wall, 117VAC from my variac, and also the voltages listed on the schematic (at 117V)":


And how does it sound?

"I've had the ASR-120 in the main system for the past week. I'm actually listening to it as I type. The bass mix using the .15uF feedback caps sounds fine and is actually more "punchy" than I thought it would be (given the 8" full range Stephens Trusonics in the main cabinets). The treble is more present than what usually comes from the Pioneer, but I'm not complaining, drums sound clearer and more well defined. Plus, I've been able to hear some pick strumming where I've never noticed it before. I'm not sure if the difference is due to the amp or the recently rebuilt super tweeters. Probably a mix of both. Anyway, the amp is dead quiet on start up, even with the volume pot maxed out. I'm happy with the results but it's strange to not be able to "hear" whether or not a tube amp is on."

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Thanks to David for the pictures and description, and really nice work!

Next time, in Part 3, we'll take a look at the other Stromberg-Carlson ASR-120 amplifier, my own project, and find out how much I can mess it up, and still manage to get it to operate okay.



One Day In Loveland, Colorado, 1978


Radio Flyer, Fab, Fabrice Dolegowski, Jeanne Bacon, C.B., Tom Frech, Jimmy Clifford, James Aoyama, Kathe Davis, Loveland, Colorado, Devil's Backbone

Hi Tom -

Here's a couple scans of photos of the original Radio Flyer band, you might remember the photo-shoot that day. Amazing to think that back then you could literally walk out the back door of the communal band house and up towards the Devil's Backbone, and suddenly find yourself in the Old West.

Radio Flyer, Fab, Fabrice Dolegowski, Jeanne Bacon, C.B., Tom Frech, Jimmy Clifford, James Aoyama, Kathe Davis, Loveland, Colorado, Devil's Backbone
Fabrice "Fab" Dolegowski, Jeanne "C.B." Bacon, Tom Frech, Jimmy Aoyama-Clifford, Kathe Davis

Somewhere in some box on some shelf inside some closet, there's a couple more pics of the Patio Fryers from that same day, and maybe some negatives. When I find them, I'll scan and send them too.

I hope you're having a decently good enough day, and maybe even better than that. Don't forget what we talked about - when you're all recovered from the cancer thing, and the current virus crisis passes, you're gonna come on out here and do some drum tracks and harmony vocals when the studio opens back up.

Until next time, brother,

---Jimmy

Keep It Rock Steady, Man


It's early March of 1983, a couple days after a late winter storm tore through eastern Montana. Not dumping very much linear inches of snow, but accompanied by forty to fifty mile an hour winds that kicked up what had fallen and blowing it sideways at high velocity, the resulting high plains ground blizzard created a howling and shrieking frozen hell on earth where no beast or sane man would willingly spend more than a few minutes out in a 50 to 70 wind-chilled degrees below zero world where you can't see anything past the end of your outstretched arm, and millions of tiny razor sharp exploding ice bombs try to scour off any exposed flesh from your face.

That's a long sentence, and so are the hours spent in enforced lay-over at a funky motel in west Billings when the Interstate highway gets shut down until it can be plowed open the next morning. Luckily we were able to score some yummy and nutritious take-out road food, and beer, and enjoyed watching any one of three available channels on the tiny TV in the room:


On this particular road trip, "we" is me, your humble blog servant, and Charles "Beaver" Cavanaugh - a more engaging and continually entertaining trip companion you would be hard pressed to find. Never a dull moment with the Beav. Here's a photo from 1983 of both Beaver and I, plus some other denizens of the Colorado music scene in the early 1980s:


From left to right, that's Tom "T-Bone Thomas" Jerkins; me, the author of this blog; Beaver; Fabrice "Fab" Dolegowski; and Clark Hardin. For more details, see here.

Now back to that road trip. The next morning dawned clear and cold yet sunny, and the Interstate was opened a couple hours before noon; time to hit the road.


That might look like pavement on the highway, but it's all traction-free black glare ice with a thin sheen of sun-melted water on top, so treacherously slimy and devoid of adhesion, that if you pulled over and got out of the car, you'd either immediately start skating or quickly fall flat on your face or butt, your choice. Those 18-wheeler trucks in the right lane are going at a relatively safe, but still insane, 50 to 55mph or so. But our big 1971 Lincoln Continental Mark III was sledding down that slippery road a lot faster and insaner than that, easily overtaking and passing everyone else.

I was messing with the camera and taking pictures out of sheer panic, anything to keep my mind off certain death. That massive and heavy rear wheel drive Lincoln, only 12 years old at the time but already seeming like a living fossil from another era, was doing a slow motion controlled fishtail down the highway, the rear end constantly twitching left and right as Beaver made minute corrections of the steering wheel every second or so, and somehow almost miraculously keeping the front wheels in the center of the fast lane at 70+ miles per.

I said, "Whoa Beaver, that is some conscious driving, dude. Can't believe we're still on the road!" He laughed and said "All you got to do is keep it rock steady, man!" and then, "Hey Jimmy, roll us a big fat spliff, it'll help me concentrate!" Well, okay, that would give me something to do besides have a heart attack. And yeah, the smoke did help, and also some zen breathing - letting go and resigning myself to the fates, whatever happens.


As it happened, nothing happened. Somewhere past Big Timber we hit dry pavement and, Montana not having a speed limit, really goosed that big 460ci with a carb the size of a dinner plate, and rolled into Missoula in good time.

The weather stayed mostly sunny and even warmed up, and we had some adventures before heading back to Boulder. Including driving by pure chance into Butte for gas and magically wound up riding in a big green top-down '60s Cadillac convertible in the middle of the St Patrick's Day parade, Beaver Cavanaugh got unofficially crowned the new King of the Irish, and we got free drinks all night long at every bar and saloon downtown until dawn, and then drove out of town, excuse the expression, drunk as a couple of Irishmen.

Truly an unforgettable night. When we woke up in the middle of a sagebrush flat a hundred miles out of town I asked, "What just happened?" Beaver said, "I don't remember."

You'll have to take my word for that last story; the battery died in my camera, or it ran out of film, I can't remember.



Speaking of photographs, all of the pictures in this blog post are scans of old prints. Some years ago I lost a sizable box of photo prints, negatives and slides; thankfully the box was found. The bad news is many of the pictures were missing, as well as a lot of the negatives; the good news is I still have at least some of them.

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A few months later during the summer, we took another road trip up to Montana, this time with I-Ron, the lead singer of Beaver's reggae and rocker band, Burnt Lips. First, we stopped and visited John, whose family had a farm near Idaho Falls, between Rigby and Ririe. At the time, John was building a sawmill, and doing an amazing thing - kayaking down an irrigation ditch at full flow, the entire length of the farm:


John held the kayak steady while I-Ron got in for his turn down the chute:


After a while we made it to Missoula:


It was a beautiful warm and sunny Montana summer day, perfect for relaxing on the grassy lawn at the homestead of another of Beaver's friends, up on the Potomac River valley east of Missoula:


The Mark III was having starter issues, so it was also great weather for crawling under the car. The problem turned out to be a couple of badly corroded cables:


On this trip we took along my favorite travel guitar, a short scale '57 Duo-Sonic, along with a battery operated Pignose amp. One late night, Beaver driving, I-Ron riding shotgun, and me lounging in the Lincoln's huge leather back seat and noodling on the guitar, we were cruising along Interstate 15 between Dillon and the Idaho state line, just about the only car on the road, the full moon lighting up the shining snow capped peaks of the Bitterroot Range (the next photo shows the Bitterroots in daytime).


Remembering what Beaver had said last road trip, I was chunking the top four strings of alternating Am and G chords in a reggae style backbeat, and singing "You got to keep it rock steady... Keep it rock steady man..." Beaver turned to I-Ron and said "Roll another spliff, mon!" While I-Ron was rolling that spliff, I put what the Beav had just said into the mix; with a couple tokes came inspiration, and I came up with a cool sounding poly-rhythmic riff. After a while that became "Roll another spliff man, I got burnt lips..." And that was a good start on a strange song.

The Burnt Lips band, performing "Burnt Lips" onstage in 2016:


And here's a founding member of the original Burnt Lips group, Jeanne "C.B." Bacon, singing "Burnt Lips" at a house party somewhere in warm and sunny California:


Burnt Lips
Music by James Aoyama-Clifford
Lyrics by James Aoyama-Clifford, Charles Cavanaugh and Fabrice Dolegowski

You got to keep it rock steady, keep it rock steady, man
Keep it rock steady, keep it rock steady, man

Roll another spliff man, I got burnt lips
Put another dub on, we can move hips
Everybody party, doing your own trips
Yeah, yeah, I got burnt lips

There is a conspiracy
It is rules and idiocy
The man with the peaceful herb gets struck down
But the guns and the killing go on and on

Roll another spliff man, I got burnt lips
Put another dub on, we can move hips
Everybody party, doing your own trips
Yeah, yeah, I got burnt lips

The ambassadors from the sky
Have come to get I and I high, yeah
You don't have to ride on no alien spaceships
All you got to do is have burnt lips

Roll another spliff man, I got burnt lips
Put another dub on, we can move hips
Everybody party, doing your own trips
Yeah, yeah, I got burnt lips

Big brother man he say ban the nuclear war
But what you got your hand on that button for?
Keep it rock steady, like a good friend said
We can lose our world, if you lose your head

So, roll another spliff man, I got burnt lips
Put another dub on, we can move hips
Everybody party, doing your own trips
Yeah, yeah, yeah, I got burnt lips

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Here's some more photos from those road trips in 1983. The Salmon River, near Challis Idaho:


The Grand Teton Range in Wyoming:


Elk at sundown and bison after dark in Yellowstone National Park:


Was a crime committed while taking this picture? Just asking for a friend:


Two shots of a really interesting home-made contraption on an irrigation ditch line off of the North Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho, not too far south of Lost Trail Pass. As water flows through the sluice gate, it turns the paddle wheel which, through a crank lever, opens and closes that gate. It might have been made to meter a consistent amount of water flowing from the upper ditch into the lower one, or maybe it was a whimsical device built by an inventive farmer:


We stared at it working for over a half hour and debated just what in the heck it did. To get some scale of the size of this gizmo, the paddle wheel is about 18" in diameter; note the wire mesh critter guards to keep squirrels and raccoons off the machinery. On the back side of the mesh guard on the left, there's a couple small white rectangles attached to it - tiny signs that say, in faded red lettering, "Danger!", and "Keep Out". Maybe squirrels in Idaho know how to read:


On the North Fork of the Big Thompson River in Colorado, near home:


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Click or tap on any photo above to see larger, higher def images.